Photo essay: Sublime Sublimation


01 - twelve foot high snowbanks

 

Sublime (adj.) 1580s, “expressing lofty ideas in an elevated manner,” from Middle French sublime (15c.), or directly from Latin sublimis “uplifted, high, borne aloft, lofty, exalted, eminent, distinguished,” possibly originally “sloping up to the lintel,” from sub “up to” + limen “lintel, threshold, sill” (see limit (n.)).The sublime (n.) “the sublime part of anything, that which is stately or imposing” is from 1670s.

– from the Online Etymology Dictionary

01a - snow strata

 

Giant snowbanks pile up with geological strata of precipitation and street grime. Their surfaces evaporate directly into thin air, leaving behind fantastic fractal landscapes.

02 - buried fenceposts

05 - mount sublime

Freeze. Thaw. Plow. Evaporate. Melt. Shovel. Freeze. Snow. Evaporate again.

The sun carves sculptures out of ice and air.

03 - iceshroom

04 - sublime sculpture

06 - crystal layers

“Sublimation is part of the royal art where the true gold is made. (…) It is not a voluntary and forcible channeling of instinct into a spurious field of application, but an alchymical transformation for which fire and prima materia are needed.”

– Carl Jung

07 - crystal contrast

08 - snow yinyang

The snow and ice crystals capture dirt and then evaporate, forming a crusty layer of grit that compresses back down into the earth.  As we live and breathe, so do we compress our experiences and impulses into acts of creation.

09 - snow grit

10 - dirty snow lungs 1

11 - dirty air filter

Some of these snowbanks are like dirty air filters, overused through a long winter.

12 - dirty snow lungs 2

13 - groundmelt

It’s the pure stuff that sublimates. The rest of it lingers and melts into oil slick.

13a - dirtmelt

14 - parkinglot snow

Come on, it’s time to put this winter away, already.

15 - sublime sidewalk

Darkness begone. Spring forward into the light.

16 - sublimated shadow

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About danspira

My blog is at: http://danspira.com. My face in real life appears at a higher resolution, although I do feel pixelated sometimes.

Posted on March 31, 2015, in Art, Metaphors, photography, Psychology and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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